Monday, March 19, 2012

Why?

Five years ago, I had no idea what a Passover Seder Dinner was.  I am not Jewish, and I only know one Jewish person- my BFF, Alli.  I noticed a lot of Christians talking about attending one, but to be honest, I didn't get it.  And then we were invited to one.  My biggest concern, was that I was about to attend a two hour meal with littles in tow, one of which I knew could not sit still for two full hours, while the reading of the Haggadah was taking place.  The lovely hostess reassured me in every possible way, reminding me that Jewish families have been celebrating Passover for over two thousand years, and if it hadn't worked with many small children, the tradition (I know that's the wrong word) probably wouldn't still be going strong.

We attended a Christian Passover, (which is to say that we see Jesus as the fulfillment of everything while we are celebrating- we no longer wait for our redeemer.) and my eyes were wonderfully opened to something that's been there all along- a rich tapestry of symbolism and meaning that forms the very base for those of us who have chosen the Christian faith.  I'm by no means an expert on any of this, but after that first Passover, we were hooked and have hosted one ever since.  You see, Passover was what Jesus was celebrating during that "last supper."

During the Passover meal, the plan of Jesus coming as our ultimate rescue, with the intent of leading us to the Promised Land unfolds in bits and pieces.  The re-telling of the Exodus is told, tasted in symbolic food elements, read about, and God is praised.  At another point in the meal, three pieces of Matzo (unleavened bread, leaven of course representing sin) are taken, and one is separated, set apart, hidden, wrapped in a white cloth, hidden, and then later found by children who receive a sweet reward when they return to the table.

The Matzo itself has been pierced, striped and later broken (symbolism anyone?) and shared so we all may eat some.  (Communion) Four cups of juice are drank throughout the meal, each one for a different purpose and with praise and thanks to God who delivers us. If you are looking for resources to host your own, Google is full of Christian Seder how-to's.  (I hate that phrase by the way, but I don't know how else to say it.)  I don't want to recommend one unless I've taken the time to fully read through it, but again, there are many options out there and they will walk you through the readings, the meal, and the elements needed for this Feast.

There are different elements of sweet symbolism woven throughout the entire meal, and each time something new strikes my heart and makes me marvel at the depth of His love and plan for us all.  As Christians, we are not required to celebrate this, but the sweetness that follows when you do, is undeniable, so if you are on the fence and considering attending or hosting one, I encourage you to jump in.  It's a beautiful ceremony and you will most certainly be blessed far beyond what I am inadequately able to describe, but I do hope this answers (at least in part) some of the great questions you guys have been asking of me.


P.S. There's still a little bit of time to enter my giveaway if you haven't done that yet!

13 comments:

  1. Just found your lovely blog, and I'm a new follower ~ so nice to meet you!
    Best,
    Anne ♥♥

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  2. this is so cool that you do this. i want to too! maybe next year?? i love the jewish traditions and all their sybolism. i think there's so much to learn from it!

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  3. Thank you for sharing this. It's so eye opening to know exactly where our faith comes from and the meaning behind the rituals that started so long ago. Blessings!

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  4. This is so interesting. I just finished reading Sen Joe Lieberman's book The Gift of Rest which is all about the Sabbath. It not only covers how the Jewish observe the Sabbath, but how Christians can incorporate "rest" into their weekly schedule. I highly recommend the book. It is written in a very readable style, with humor and wonderful anecdotes. Thanks for sharing about the Seder. I have to admit, I was a little confused when you said that you host one, but now I understand!

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  5. Our pastor taught in Israel for 15 years as the head of the IBEX program at The Master's College. He's also an official (licensed? approved? I can't think of the right word) tour guide and has been a part of many archaelogical digs. The list of his accomplishments and credentials could go on and on but needless to say he loves the Jewish people and culture. He has hosted a Seder dinner for our church in the past. It's so interesting to me but even more than that, it's important to me. If we don't understand the Old Testament, we can never grasp the full meaning of the New Testament. I love that you are living that out. I may follow your lead and look into hosting one for our family this year. Thanks for sharing this!

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  6. What a beautiful tradition to keep alive. I just read a fantastic article about hosting one as well.

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  7. love that you so this! i was anywhere close to you...i'd so be inviting myself over for dinner.

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  8. A dear friend of mine invited me to her Seder dinner this year. My husband, sister and I will all be attending and I am so looking forward to it!
    NN ;)

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  9. I would love to have a Metro Retro tote to match your bag:-) I love 31 Gifts!!! And the ministry it provides!

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  10. Today in Bible study we looked at the symbolism in Zechariah and Matthew all pointing to the redemption found in Christ. And I forget, but I want to remember the depth and richness of symbolism because our God is so detailed and it speaks to His glory in such a beautiful way. With that said, I want to attend a dinner like this! Mmm... Remember my secret? Maybe next year I'll come to yours. I'm hoping at least! :)

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  11. I have always always wanted to do this. We just went through a Tabernacle replica at Saddleback Church last week and it was completely incredible. I love the Jewish traditions that the Lord asked his people to participate in, I wish we did more of them as Christians. I need to look up a Seder dinner...fabulous.

    xoxo

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  12. I love this. I've always wanted to attend one.

    You did such a beautiful job of describing the details for us...

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  13. Can I attend yours?
    I would love to attend one; I'm not sure I am at a point where I would like to host one yet, but I have no idea of anyone around me who is going to host one either.

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